Vh1’s ‘you Oughta Know’ Concert To Feature The Lumineers, Lorde, Ed Sheeran

Concert Series at The Frick Collection to Celebrate 75th Anniversary

| Getty Get Entertainment Newsletters: Subscribe Follow: Ed Sheeran , Ed Sheeran You Oughta Know , Matt Nathanson , The Lumineers , VH1 You Oughta Know , Emeli Sande , Haim , Johnnyswim , Lorde , Lorde You Oughta Know , The Lumineers You Oughta Know , You Oughta Know , You Oughta Know Concert , You Oughta Know Show , Entertainment News NEW YORK — NEW YORK (AP) The Lumineers, Lorde and Ed Sheeran will perform at a concert Nov. 11 to celebrate VH1’s “You Oughta Know” campaign. “You Oughta Know” highlights emerging musicians and launched in 2005. VH1 announced Friday that Scottish R&B singer Emeli Sande and rock sister trio Haim also will perform at New York’s Roseland Ballroom for the event. The concert will stream live online and will premiere Nov. 21 on VH1. Singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson and married duo Johnnyswim also will hit the stage. Past “You Oughta Know” artists include Adele, Bruno Mars, Amy Winehouse and Mumford & Sons. New Zealand singer Lorde currently has the No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with “Royals,” and Sheeran and the Lumineers earned nominations in top Grammy categories earlier this year. ____

Debuts this year include Russian pianist Anna Vinnitskaya (winner of the 2007 Queen Elizabeth Competition); renowned Swiss recorder player Maurice Steger; the award-winning Meccorre Quartett from Poland; acclaimed Swiss pianist Olivier Cave; and the internationally recognized Minguet Quartett from Austria. The Frick concert series also has a long history of reaching audiences far beyond those present for performances. Since 1939 the concerts have been broadcast on the Municipal Broadcasting System, American Public Radio, and WNYC Radio. Currently, concerts can be heard on WQXR/National Public Radio. Recent performances are posted on the station’s Web site for up to two years. In addition, since 2009, four concerts annually have been broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in the United Kingdom. For complete program information, visit www.frick.org/programs/concerts . 75TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON Il Pianoforte Italiano- Clementi, Dallapiccola, Pistoia, Scarlatti, and Bach transcriptions of Marcello and Vivaldi Miguet Quartett (debut) Haydn, Ligeti, Mendelssohn Trio Settecento: Rachel Barton Pine, violin; John Mark Rozendaal, cello; David Schrader, harpsichord 18th-Century Fiddle Music in the Scottish Tradition: Corelli, Mackintosh, McGibbon, Munro, Geminiani, Erskine, traditional tunes Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919), the coke and steel industrialist, philanthropist, and art collector, left his New York residence and his remarkable collection of European paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts to the public “for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a gallery of art, [and] of encouraging and developing the study of fine arts and of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects.” Designed and built for Mr. Frick in 1913 and 1914 by Thomas Hastings of Carrere and Hastings, the mansion provides a grand domestic setting for the masterworks it contains and is reminiscent of the noble houses of Europe. Of special note are paintings from the Renaissance through the nineteenth century by masters such as Bellini, Constable, Corot, Fragonard, Gainsborough, Goya, El Greco, Holbein, Ingres, Manet, Monet, Rembrandt, Renoir, Titian, Turner, Velazquez, Vermeer, and Whistler. Mr. Frick’s superb examples of French eighteenth-century furniture, Italian Renaissance bronzes, and Limoges enamels are celebrated as well. The galleries are beloved by the public for their contemplative ambiance, while the interior and exterior gardens and the amenities added in the 1930s and 1970s contribute to the serenity of the visitor’s experience.

Carnegie Hall concert goes on, after strike canceled performance

A strike by stagehands forced the cancellation, but the union temporarily suspended its strike on Thursday, allowing the concert hall to open its doors for now. A union leader told Reuters he was optimistic the two sides could reach a permanent deal by Friday. The dispute hangs on whether the stagehands – mostly prop-makers, carpenters and electricians – should have a role in a new educational wing that the Carnegie Hall Corp plans to open above the hall next year. The corporation wants to hire cheaper labor at the education wing. Negotiations with the union took an unprecedented turn on Wednesday when Local 1 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees decided to go on strike for the first time in the history of Carnegie Hall. However, when James Claffey, president of Local 1, emerged from negotiations on Thursday afternoon, he announced the union had agreed to pull down the picket line for the day, citing progress in the talks. “This is a goodwill gesture towards Carnegie Hall,” said Claffey, whose local has negotiated some of the most lucrative pay in the industry. He later said further progress had been made, and that even though picketing would continue, he hoped to reach a deal by Friday. Carnegie Hall’s five full-time stagehands make an average of $400,000 per year including benefits, The New York Times reported, citing the organization’s tax returns. Claffey said there were many more stagehands represented by the union who work only sporadically. “This dispute is not about those employees,” Claffey said. “This is about everyone else. These are middle class employees.” The strike forced Carnegie Hall to cancel a performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra with violinist Joshua Bell.