‘prisoners,’ ‘wadjda’ And Other New Movies, Reviewed

Its success convinced Disney that people loved Johnny Depp, and a franchise was born. Pirates of the Caribbean. Source: Fanpop.com The next two movies in the trilogy in 2006 and 2007 grossed over $2 billion. Although the trilogy reached a definitive conclusion in the third film, Disney produced a fourth film in the franchise, On Stranger Tides, with only a handful of the original cast returning. Although the film received mediocre reviews , it still grossed over $1 billion worldwide on a budget of $250 million. So deep was Disney’s faith in Johnny Depp that it expected his star power to carry The Lone Ranger, a dusty old franchise that many people weren’t familiar with, to box-office success. To date, The Lone Ranger has only grossed $245 million worldwide, not enough to cover its production budget of $215 million, plus worldwide marketing costs. An unfamiliarity with the character, poor reviews , and the notion that Depp’s Tonto was merely Jack Sparrow in war paint, all contributed to the film’s poor box-office performance. Disney was obviously shocked by The Lone Ranger’s failure, pushing the next installment of the Pirates franchise, originally scheduled for a summer 2015 release, back into the summer of 2016 to rethink its budget and script. Animated directors can’t always direct live-action films Just as Disney put too much faith in Johnny Depp, it also believed that Andrew Stanton [Editor’s note: the original version of this article misreported the director], the acclaimed director of Toy Story, could do no wrong. The company believed in Stanton so much that it allowed him to pursue his dream project, a big-screen adaptation of John Carter, a lesser-known science fiction tale from Tarzan author Edgar Rice Burroughs.

‘Presto’: Foxtel launches movies on demand

Their platonic friendship (yes, platonic!) is rendered with great humor, poignancy and dignity. Michael OSullivan (No rating) The Wizard of Oz 3D IMAX (PG) Seeing The Wizard of Oz on the big screen also offers an opportunity to consider the incredible special effects, considering the film was shot more than seven decades ago and long before computer-generated imagery. The black-and-white scenes of Dorothy battling against the wind as a twister approaches were especially transporting. Stephanie Merry 1/2 Wadjda (PG) Youre seeing a world on screen that, until now, has been largely hidden from the filmgoing world at large. Because in addition to being a terrific garden-variety coming-of-age film, Wadjda happens to be the first feature-length movie ever made in Saudi Arabia all the more notable in that its been made by a woman, about a young girl chafing against the religious and social strictures of a kingdom literally shrouded in sexual anxiety, misogyny and severe repression. Ann Hornaday 1/2 Salinger (PG-13) While much of the movie consists of variations on this same theme that Salinger was a brilliant, flawed man the film also delves into more salacious matters, including the role of Catcher in the shootings of Ronald Reagan, John Lennon and Rebecca Schaeffer (gunmen John Hinckley Jr., Mark David Chapman and Robert John Bardo were all fans of the novel). Stephanie Merry The Henchmans War (Unrated) Greene, a native Washingtonian with a handful of local directorial and co-producing credits on his resume, has an eye for urban grit and an ear for tough-guy dialogue. He makes excellent use of his shadowy locations, lending War the coveted visual grime that enhances such pulp-noir material. Sean OConnell 1/2 Battle of the Year (PG-13) Lee is attempting to keep a spotlight shining on b-boy culture, an aggressive style of street dancing that consists of body-contorting twists, flips, leaps, spins and poses set to hip-hop music. Lee showcased this next level of competitive breakdancing in his award-winning 2008 documentary Planet B-Boy , and a feature film building on that awareness makes complete sensejust not five years later, when the fad appears to have faded. Sean OConnell My Lucky Star (Unrated) Bringing Sophies comics to life, the movie interjects drawings and animated sequences. The camera spins excitedly, and the editing is brisk. Split-screen compositions evoke the 1960s, as do Sophies pop-art ensembles, which include a lilac wig with matching lipstick. This girlie romp is less about martial arts and espionage than stuffed animals and dress-up. Mark Jenkins 1/2 Good OlFreda (PG) Ryan White weaves in archival footage of girls fainting and images of old headlines. The soundtrack consists primarily of Beatles covers. While the tales of the bands spectacular rise create a genial mood, the film feels superficial. Kelly can be cagey, and when a voice offscreen asks if she ever dated any of the guys, she demurs, saying, Thats personal. Stephanie Merry 1/2 Ip Man: The Final Fight (PG-13) The showiest action sequence involves lion dancers who battle atop high wooden posts. The grittiest and final one sends Ip to save one of his former pupils, whos risked fighting for money inside the gangster-controlled Kowloon Walled City. To add to the drama, the showdown occurs during a typhoon. Mark Jenkins Generation Iron (PG-13) Generation Iron succeeds where other rote sports docs often struggle.

Movies that changed B.C.’s film world

What it accomplished: The movie made waves in the independent film community all over the world, and clearly set Vancouver apart from its Toronto anglo cousin. Molly Parker won the Genie for best performance, and soon made the leap South, where she continues to work in leading TV serials, including a new recurring role in the death-themed Dexter. a Air Bud (1997) a Vancouver is now home to a lot of kid movies, and if you ever wondered why, you need look no further than this original Air Bud. The story of a boy and a very special dog capable of shooting hoop, Air Bud launched an entire sub-industry in the city a as well as melt hearts around the world, thanks to its tender depiction of kid angst. What it accomplished: Air Bud marched to the top of the Canadian box office, winning the Golden Reel award (for best gross) at the Genies, and received a significant U.S. release through Disney. It also earned Kevin Zegers a Hollywood career, and former actor Charles Martin Smith a great reputation for directing kids and animals a which he proves once more with the new movie, Dolphin Tale. a X-Men (2000) a Vancouver had hosted many big U.S. productions before X-Men came and planted its mutant feet in the wet ground, but this was the first giant popcorn movie that cut the critical mustard. What it accomplished: Before X-Men, sprawling epics such as The 13th Warrior, Fantastic Four and The Core seemed to prove that shooting a big movie in Vancouver was the kiss of death. X-Men was far from a disaster, and gave the city its first mega-franchise. a Juno (2007) a Jason Reitman came to Vancouver to shoot a little movie about a young woman who gets pregnant, and decides to give up her baby to a yuppy couple.

And yet Malcolm Turnbull reportedly thinks hed make a great choice to run NBN Co. Here’s why he’s wrong . 50 things top IT pros need to know [ad] This 18 page whitepaper ( click here to access ) explores 10 things you should know to become an epic IT manager, 40 other essential tips to advance your IT career and practical guidance for starting an IT consulting business. Great articles on other sites Thin wire could strip Telstra of high speeds Turnbulls first 100 days: Tough times ahead for a new Minister Intellectual Property , News – Written by Renai LeMay on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 13:04 – 12 Comments Presto: Foxtel launches movies on demand Tags: android , apple , foxtel , foxtel go , foxtel play , foxtel presto , iptv , mac , movies on demand , pc , presto , tablet news National pay TV giant Foxtel has launched a new online service dubbed Presto , which will see consumers charged $24.99 per month to access a regularly updating collection of great films, all streamed through the Internet, as opposed to its existing pay TV platform. In a statement issued yesterday, the company said Prestos launch, slated for later this year, aligns perfectly with the increasing appetite for movie content delivered over the internet across different devices. It will feature content already licensed to the Foxtel Movies channels, including access to the biggest box office releases of 2012 at launch along with on demand access to the Foxtel Movies vault of recent and older favourite movies Richard Freudenstein, Foxtel Chief Executive, said: Australians are hungry for different ways to experience great entertainment when they want and how they want. The launch of Presto as a second brand allows us to meet the needs of different customer segments more effectively and is another way Foxtel is continuing to make its content more accessible. Foxtel offers distinctive ways to watch: the market-leading full Foxtel service for the whole family, complete with the widest range of channels, high quality products like iQ, HD and Foxtel Go. We also offer flexible and spontaneous access to our content with Foxtel Play. Presto is the next major step in offering customers a product thats just right for them. Presto will be a great online service for movie lovers with streaming through an intuitive interface and great movies backed by curated collections, recommendations and critics reviews. Our aim is to utilise Foxtels assets and expertise in a smart way to capture a healthy share of the growing digital market. We are already investing in content, platforms and experiences to delight movie-loving customers so it makes sense that we launch Presto as part of our digital media content strategy. Presto includes access to all seven live Foxtel Movies channels: Foxtel Movies Premiere, Foxtel Movies Comedy, Foxtel Movies Drama/ Romance, Foxtel Movies Thriller/ Crime, Foxtel Movies Action/ Adventure, Foxtel Movies Family, and Foxtel Movies Masterpiece without the need to buy-through a basic tier, unlike Foxtels more traditional pay TV service. Foxtel Movies offers the best of all the major studios and key independents including MGM, NBCUniversal, Paramount Pictures, Roadshow Films, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox, The Walt Disney Company, Warner Bros. Entertainment, Hopscotch Entertainment One, ICON, Studiocanal and Transmission Films. Presto will launch initially for PC and Mac computers and will be available on compatible iOS and Android tablets to Presto subscribers shortly after.