New York’s Horse And Buggy Losing Ground To Animal Rights Group

New York magazine considers going biweekly

When it gets dark, he says, he’ll take out his camera he doesn’t use a flash and go looking for “pockets of light” or well-lit streets and see what he finds. The random anonymous people (and occasional dog) he snaps will join his voluminous collection, Humans of New York, an ongoing blog and now a book (St. Martin’s Press, on sale Tuesday). New York and its colorful populace have proved irresistible to Stanton, 29, who made his way to the city three years ago after losing his job as a bond trader in Chicago. He has photographed about 5,000 New Yorkers of every age, every ethnic background, in every imaginable outfit (and usually in broad daylight). What started as a hobby became a passion and a profession, after he nearly starved the first year, he admits. “New York has the biggest, most eclectic collection of people in the world,” says the affable Stanton, whose work found a distinctive edge when he began talking to his subjects. Brandon Stanton in his element, photographing the ”Humans of New York.’ (Photo: John Berube) His photos are accompanied by little stories. “It’s become much more of a storytelling blog than a photography blog,” says Stanton, who looks for people he can talk to, often sitting on benches, or walking alone. Conversations can last from 15 seconds to 10 minutes, but, he says, “When I hear my caption, I know it.” One day he shot an old man in a wheelchair his wild white hair and beard forming a pillowy halo around his intense face. The caption: “I look like God, don’t I”?

14. Digital now accounts for about half the companys ad revenue, but that is attributable as much to prints steady erosion as it is to digitals gains in recent years. Before the recession, New York racked up 3,343 ad pages in 2007, according to MIN 1,500 pages more than it is expected to tally this year. Ad pages fell 12 percent in 2008, followed by a staggering 27 percent drop in 2009. And in a move that is sure to be worrisome as it pushes for digital dollars, Web traffic in September dropped to 3.6 million unique monthly visitors, according to comScore, a 16 percent drop from last year. A Wasserstein family trust inherited the magazine after the death of Bruce Wasserstein in 2009. The financier brought it for $55 million back in 2003. So far, the Wasserstein family has kept the magazine and websites rolling, but it is not clear what the trusts capacity is to absorb losses over a prolonged period. The most recent example in the weekly media world holds little promise. When stereo equipment magnate Sidney Harman died in April 2011, only months after rescuing Newsweek, his family trust soon bailed on the money-losing magazine. Like other weekly publications, New York has resorted to more double issues in slow periods and a gradual cutback in frequency. In the first half of the year, it published 20 issues, not 26. For the full year, the magazine plans to publish 42 issues and is increasingly relying on one- or two-shot specials such as New York Weddings and New York Design Hunting to pad its ad- page tally. On the print side, circulation has stagnated around the 400,000 level.

Capital New York Hires Three Columnists As Relaunch Nears

“It’s all a bunch of hysteria,” said Hansen, 33, as she guided her horse, Sara, through Manhattan traffic toward Central Park. “Their agenda is not animal welfare. It’s animal rights.” “We bred horses to be powerful, willing partners in our civilization,” said Hansen, who wore a long coat and feathered felt hat. “They project their own human emotions onto horses.” Like many New York classics, the Central Park carriage ride was immortalized in cinema. In Woody Allen’s “Manhattan,” Allen’s character kisses his young girlfriend, played by Mariel Hemingway, in the back seat of a carriage. The image has been used again and again in TV series such as “Sex in the City,” “Seinfeld” and “30 Rock.” “People come to us for the clip-clop,” said Hansen. “Nobody wants to pet a fender.” ‘VERY NEW YORK’ Clinton Park Stables, home to 78 horses, sits on the far west side of Manhattan, a 20 minute ride from Central Park. It was built in the 1880s for street sweepers’ horses. “Because this is an urban stable, every square foot is used for something,” said Hansen, as she led a tour past old-fashioned carriages, manufactured in Indiana, and a blacksmith working on a horseshoe along a row of 80-square-foot stalls. The rules regulating the carriage industry are set by the city. Horses work no more than 9 hours a day, and every year spend at least five weeks on a farm. A veterinarian examines every horse twice a year and city inspectors visit regularly. Hansen, a former doctoral student in French history, jokes that the stable has more inspections “than a day-care facility.” Over the last 30 years, three horses have died in traffic accidents – in 1985, 1990 and 2006. New York Class counts 19 accidents over the last two years that resulted in injury, but the carriage industry says most of them were minor incidents. For Allie Feldman, executive director of New York Class, the solution is simple: Horses don’t belong in traffic and an eco-friendly motorized alternative could catch on with tourists.

humans of new york

Now that Capital is close to filling up its reporter ranks on the politics and media desks, editors are lining up several weekly city columnists for the site’s early November relaunch. Capital’s first three columnists will be Jim Windolf, a Vanity Fair contributing editor who has written for several publications and started the New York Observer’s “New York World” column; Joanna Molloy, a veteran Daily News gossip writer and co-author of a new book on the subject; and Glynnis MacNicol, a writer and co-founder of TheLi.st and former media editor at Business Insider and Mediaite. The model will be more Jimmy Breslin than Joe Scarborough. While Politico columnists, like Scarborough or National Review editor Rich Lowry, comment on political and policy debates, Capital’s writers will produce reported columns that also express a point of view. They’ll draw from the city columnist tradition that extends from tabloid muckraking, a la Breslin, to the New York Times’ Clyde Haberman. Capital co-editor Tom McGeveran told HuffPost the new columns will focus on “New York issues, New York personalities and New York places.” “This is a tradition in which the best columns always entertain,” McGeveran said. “Sometimes they even change the minds of the city’s big decision makers; better yet is when a columnist changes their plans.” The new columnists are not joining full-time, but will write weekly for the site. However, Capital has been filling up the newsroom with full-time reporters and editors since Politico purchased the three-year-old site in September. On the politics front, Capital’s hired Daily News veteran Joanne Wasserman , the Albany Times Union’s Jimmy Vielkind , the New York Post’s Sally Goldenberg . Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo will now be joined on the desk by several additional reporters, including TV Newser’s Alex Weprin, Women’s Wear Daily’s Matthew Lynch, former Newsday and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Nicole Levy, and World Policy Journal’s Johana Bhuiyan. In addition, Peter Sterne will cover media part-time for the site while finishing at Columbia University. Follow Michael Calderone on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mlcalderone FOLLOW MEDIA