Nascar Chairman Brian France Ends Lawsuit Against Former Wife

Brian and Megan France settle lengthy court fight

Although their divorce was final in 2007, France filed a lawsuit in September 2008 alleging that Megan broke the terms of their divorce when it came to visitation rights, the hiring of nannies and the confidentiality clause. NASCAR chairman Brian France (AP Photo) MORE: France deals with credibility crisis | Sponsor questions NASCAR’s integrity Because he contended she broke the terms of the divorce, he had withheld $6 million in payments, according to court documents. The lawsuit, filed in North Carolina District Court in Charlotte, was dismissed Sept. 26, according to the clerk of court docket database, although the actual order of dismissal wasn’t immediately available from the clerk’s office. “The parties have voluntarily dismissed all pending litigation and amicably resolved all existing disputes on confidential terms that are consistent with the best interests of their children and their respective families,” Brian France attorney Johnny Stephenson said in a statement. “There will be no further public comment about these private matters.” The case file showed the massive wealth of Brian France, who succeeded his father as Chairman and CEO of NASCAR in 2003. In 2005 at the time of their marriage — the second between them — Brian France listed assets of $554 million and loans of $26 million, according to documents in the case. He earned $9.05 million in 2004 as NASCAR chairman and CEO. As part of the divorce, Megan France kept a $3.2 million Charlotte home and a $2 million vacant lot. Megan France argued in the case that Brian was not as involved in the life of their children as he should have been and had held back payments for some prep school fees for her daughter from a previous marriage. OLDER

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Megan France contended that her ex-husband delayed monthly alimony payments and failed to make a $3 million installment promised under the separation agreement. In court files, France argued that he wasnt required to pay the $3 million because his wife breached the agreement. Last month, the two agreed to end their court dispute, their lawyers say. The parties have voluntarily dismissed all pending litigation and amicably resolved all existing disputes on confidential terms that are consistent with the best interests of their children and their respective families, John Stephenson, one of the lawyers representing Brian France, wrote in an email to the Observer. There will be no further public comment about these private matters. For years, much of the legal fight was hidden from the public because a judge sealed the France file. The Observer and news partner NBC Charlotte waged a lengthy court battle to open the file, finally winning in May . The news partners argued that France had no compelling interest that supersedes the publics right to open courts and files. The unsealed documents showed that Brian Frances assets totaled more than $550 million in 2005 and that NASCAR paid him more than $9 million in 2004. The records also shone light on a contentious divorce. Brian France hired private investigators to keep an eye on his wife, the documents show. Megan France also alleged that her ex-husband threatened to financially devastate her. But the details of the recent settlement will not be made public, the lawyers said. Like many court settlements, it involves a confidentiality clause.

“We always worked together with a lot of passion,” Boulez said after learning that Chereau, whom he called “the only director I wanted to work with”, had died. “What made his work stand out was the extreme precision with which he created a character out of the slightest figure,” he told Le Monde. “I always felt confident with Chereau – when he wanted to try something out, I always told him ‘yes’.” Chereau also turned his talents to the cinema, producing films while he also worked in theatre and opera. His first efforts in the 1970s were not critically acclaimed. But he won a Cesar, the French equivalent of the Oscars, for best screenplay in 1983 for “L’homme blesse” (The Wounded Man). In 1994, his film “La Reine Margot” (Queen Margot) won the Jury Prize and best actress prizes at the Cannes festival. Five Cesars followed the next year. His 2001 film “Intimite” (Intimacy) won the Golden Bear for best film at the Berlin Film Festival. Chereau credited his parents with stirring his interest in art, especially drawing. “I knew at 15 I wanted to do theatre,” he once said. “It came from drawing. I read texts and I drew.” At high school, he designed sets for the plays he directed.