Is California Going Too Far To Protect Celebrity Kids From Paparazzi? (+video)

I was just talking about that to my friend the other night, how that is my guilty pleasure.” Ashley Benson “Coffee! In the morning hot, but at the end of the day, iced.” Bryce Dallas Howard “‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians.’ I had never watched it, and then when I was super-pregnant I was overdue and I actually had a pretty bad injury and I got put on bed rest and I couldnt move … And I was like, ‘I just want to watch the Kardashians, I never watched it before! I just really want to see what this is all about.’ And I have since watched every single episode. I love it … I love it.” Cynthia Nixon “I really love cheese. I can have cheese all day long every day. Pretty crazy about salted caramels as well. Also, toffee.” Ross Mathews “My guilty pleasure is elastic-waisted pants. And reruns of shows Ive already seen 400 times on TV.” Adrian Grenier “Chocolate every day.” Ryan Lochte “I dont know if its a guilty pleasure, but pizza and wings. Every Friday night, without fail, since I was 8 years old, [I eat] pizza and wings.” Joel McHale “Umm, ritual murder.” Joe Manganiello “Im a big ice cream fan. I do [eat ice cream a lot] when Im not training for various figurines of nudity.” Tiffani Thiessen “Red wine and chocolate.” Octavia Spencer “Im a big salty person, I like salty snacks, so I love going to the movies because I get to have popcorn.

Celebrity chef dabbles in Scotch

The law targets any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that persons employment. It further specifies that harassment means knowing and willful conduct directed at a specific child that seriously alarms, annoys, torments, or terrorizes the child and that serves no legitimate purpose and that includes recording an image or voice. These provisions worry education reporter Andrea Johnson, who writes for the Minot Daily News in North Dakota. She often covers childrens issues and notes that there are already many privacy protections in place for most children. It is very easy for parents to get riled up over privacy concerns when a new law passes. I am concerned that this might spread to other states, fanned by parents who have growing concerns over the privacy rights of their own children, she says. Its hard enough to do our jobs without having new restrictions such as the requirement to get written permission from parents for legitimate interviews with their children, Ms. Johnson adds. Legal challenges to the statute are likely, says Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. Reporters and paparazzi will claim it infringes on their First Amendment rights, she says via e-mail. There are already laws on the books that prohibit stalking and assaults of celebrities and everyone else. Prosecutors might find it challenging to apply the actual terms of this statute, she says. Questions will arise as to the paparazzi’s intent and whether their obnoxious behavior is the same as harassment or threatening behavior. Not all legal observers agree. There is no First Amendment right to harass others, says constitutional scholar Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the University of California at Irvine Law School. Californias new law does not create any new crime, It simply increases the punishment under existing laws for those who intentionally engage in harassing conduct directed at children that makes them fear for their safety, he says via e-mail. Professor Levenson says this law will give celebrities more ammunition to ask law enforcement to get involved in protecting their privacy and the privacy of their children. While I’m not sure anything will really stop aggressive paparazzi, if one goes to jail, the others might think twice, she adds. The real solution to this problem lies elsewhere, suggests Gordon Coonfield, a communication professor at Villanova University in Philadelphia.

EDT Celebrity chef dabbles in Scotch $200 whisky from the man famous for $32 burgers Want to see how this story relates to your watchlist? Just add items to create a watchlist now: Add The Dalmore Selected by Daniel Boulud The bottle: The Dalmore Selected by Daniel Boulud , $200 The backstory: We have celebrity chef-branded cookware. And celebrity chef-branded frozen pizza. Heck, theres even a celebrity chef-endorsed antacid . So, why not have a single-malt Scotch that bears a celebrity chefs name? That was the thinking when The Dalmore, a whiskey with roots going back to 1839, partnered with French-born, New York-based chef Daniel Boulud on this limited-release bottle (just 1,000 will be made available, sold through high-end wine and liquor stores as well as eventually through the chefs online store ). Even though he keeps busy running 14 restaurants around the globe, serving a $32 braised rib and foie gras burger, among other dishes, Boulud was actively involved in creating the spirit, working with Dalmore master distiller Richard Paterson on selecting specific barrels to create the final blend, which includes whiskies aged up to 18 years. (But its a mistake to call the final product a blend since all the whisky in it originates from a single distillery.) I wanted a generous, full-bodied whisky, but with aromas of caramel and also some candied orange and toasted praline, says Boulud. Um, who says Frenchmen drink only Cognac? Key stat: Click to Play Daniel Boulud tries his hand at Scotch After months of working with the renowned distillers at The Dalmores, chef Daniel Boulud is offering a bespoke single malt based on the cuisine of his restaurants. Charles Passy joins the News Hub for Weekend Sip. (Photo: AP) The Dalmore (and the brand name always has The in front of it) has gained a reputation for offering some of the worlds most expensive and sought-after whiskies. A case in point: The recently released Richard Paterson Collection 12 bottles of whiskies that date as far back as 1926, packaged together for $1.4 million. That makes the $200 Boulud bottle a steal by comparison. Also see: 10 things celebrity chefs wont say What we think about it: Bouluds whiskey lives up to its heavy promise at least on the nose.

Celebrity Cruises heads to St. Barts

Celebrity will visit Gustavia, the capital of the French island, for the first time in November 2014 with the 2,170-passenger Celebrity Constellation, according to spokeswoman Tavia Robb. St. Barts (also known as St. Barths) is a popular vacation spot for music moguls, supermodels and movie stars, among others. Jetsetters are sometimes spotted (and photographed) on the island’s white-sand beaches, hanging out on extravagant yachts, shopping in designer boutiques, dining in gourmet eateries and lounging at fancy resorts. The island’s claim to fame includes as a location for segments of The Real Housewives of New York City. Celebrity will include the island on three cruises the line said were created with “upscale travelers” in mind. Two nine-day cruises, Nov. 29 and Dec. 14, 2014, are round-trip from Fort Lauderdale and also include calls at Royal Caribbean’s private beach resort at Labadee, Haiti; San Juan; St. Croix; and St.