Ikea’s New Uk Boss Homing In On Change

Scottish independence: Split from UK energy market call

How do we help children create their own space, to have their own identity. We are also seeing other trends. I was up in Edinburgh and we see with students, theres a generation of people going to university and coming home. No one has the cash to set up on their own. We can see these ‘returnees heading back to the parental home, so its a huge opportunity for us in the 21 to 30-year-old market. We have two or three ‘rooms in our Edinburgh store where we have a bedsit-in-a-bedroom set-up. You might have a high bed with a table or desk underneath. There could be a seating option for their friends, a lot of storage. This is their space. She adds: The role of the living room has changed: technology now means that children are moving back into the living room. Everybody is sitting in the same space but theyre all doing different stuff. Watching TV, playing on the iPad, watching a film on the laptop. Using the knowledge we have of how people live helps provide solutions for everyday life. Part of the more local approach, Drakeford admits, is tailoring the companys product mix to the disposable income in each region. She is shocked at just how separate London now is from the rest of the UK. Average transaction values in the capital are 25pc above Ikeas stores elsewhere in the country. Drakeford says: The difference between London and the rest of the country is huge.

UK Women’s Cross Country Places Second

It would then pour billions of pounds into boosting Scotlands green energy potential, and also reduce the flow of oil coming from the North Sea, in a bid to cut CO2 emissions. Backed by the Scottish Greens who are hosting their conference in Inverness this weekend the authors argue that in private hands the UK energy market is on the point of collapse, lacks investment and is pushing up bills for hard-pressed consumers. But critics last night dismissed the proposals as fanciful, saying any plan which ended the UK-wide energy market would mean the vast cost of subsidising expensive green energy would fall on households in Scotland. The paper, written by contributors from Glasgow, Heriot-Watt and Glasgow Caledonian universities, says that a Scottish Energy Authority (SEA) and a Scottish Electricity Generation Corporation should be created after powers are transferred to Holyrood to oversee the entire energy sector. It would then run down nuclear, coal and gas-fired stations and plough massive investment into renewable energy by issuing billions of pounds worth of government bonds. In return, it argues, wind farms and new renewable projects will all be owned by the government or community groups. The paper claims bills could be lower because government could borrow at a lower rate and would not have to make a profit. It concludes that because of inherent market failures in the UKs energy market, only by breaking out of this policy regime and developing an alternative agenda around new forms of strategic planning and public ownership can Scotland fulfil its true potential and wider obligations as an energy-rich nation. It also calls for a completely different approach to the North Sea. Rather than an over-focus on producing as much oil as possible current UK and Scottish Government objectives coincide in trying to increase the rate of production the SEA would seek to reduce production from the North Sea, developing a more integrated and responsible approach to carbon emissions. The call comes after reports on independence have shown that North Sea oil revenues will be required to pay for current spending in Scotland. It also notes that most of Scotlands privatised energy assets at present are foreign-owned. It adds: It could plausibly be argued that French, Norwegian and Russian governments through their state-owned corporations have collectively far more control over UK (and Scottish) strategic energy interests than any British political actor. Alison Johnstone, Scottish Green MSP for Lothian and a member of Holyroods economy and energy committee, said: By taking responsibility, Scotland could prioritise common ownership, create high-quality jobs and move away from the fossil fuels we simply cannot afford to burn. The move would be best achieved through independence, the authors declare, although they say it could also be achieved by transferring responsibility for energy to a devolved Scottish Government. But the plan met with little enthusiasm from the SNP government last night.

UK retailers remove ‘staggeringly offensive’ mental health costumes from sale

Macumber ran a 5K in fewer than 17 minutes for the second time this season. The University of Guelph from Canada won the women’s team competition with 60 points. The UK men’s team placed 27th overall on 688 points. MacKay Wilson was UK’s top finisher in 42nd (37 points) with a time of 25:28.89. Advertise Freshman Cassidy Hale turned in a top-10 performance in her hometown with a 17th-place time of 17.40.77 (16), Taylor Wendler was 46th with a time of 18:07.86 (45) and Anna Bostrom was UK’s No. 5 finisher placing 62nd overall with a time of 18:23.24 (60). Gabriel Harm was 154th in 26:38.37 (136), Jake Wildenmann was 178th in 26:51.93 (155), Keffri Neal 27:08.13 placed 195th (168) and Tim Layten rounded out UK’s top-5 with a 195th-place time of 27:47.09 (192). Kentucky will return to action for the last race of the regular season, the Pre-NCAA Invitational in Terre Haute, Ind., on Oct. 19. Men’s Team Results (Winner and UK Only) 1. University of Guelph: 60 27. Kentucky: 688 Men’s Individual Results (Winner and UK Only) 1. Peter Okwera: 24:20.39 42. Mackay Wilson: 25:28.89 (37) 154.

Ikea’s UK chief, Gillian Drakeford, pictured at the furniture retailer’s store in Wembley, top right,  admits the customer experience needs improvement

“We take our responsibilities very seriously which is why we will make a sizable donation to Mind.” Tesco also issued an apology, saying in a statement: “We’re really sorry for any offense this has caused and we are removing this product from sale.” Mental health charity Mind welcomed the withdrawal of the costumes, saying the retailers had shown themselves to be “extremely misguided” by offering them for sale. Slept in. Have @asda withdrawn their ‘mental patient fancy dress’ costume or are we going to organise a protest at HQ? #timetochange Alastair Campbell (@campbellclaret) September 26, 2013 Alastair Campbell “It is staggeringly offensive to the one in four of us affected by mental health problems and our families and friends, and troubling that some businesses are still so out of touch with the public mood,” spokeswoman Sue Baker said in a statement . However, Baker said the outcry the costumes provoked on the social media site Twitter was encouraging. “We hope this will urge Asda, Tesco and other retailers and manufacturers to review their processes and consider taste and decency on mental health grounds, to avoid fueling stigma and discrimination that are so damaging for large numbers of the population,” she said. Mind and the group Rethink Mental Illness run the Time to Change campaign to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination. One of the campaign’s supporters is Alastair Campbell, who was former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair’s media chief and who has publicly spoken of his battle with depression . Campbell was among those who tweeted his displeasure at the “brutally stigmatizing outfits.” “@asda and @tesco should sign up for one of the @mindcharity @Rethink_ @TimetoChange mental health training courses,” he tweeted . Campbell alleged that Amazon still carried mental health patient costumes and called for people to tweet the company, asking it to withdraw them. But in response to an inquiry from CNN, an Amazon spokesperson said: “The item you refer to is not available on Amazon.co.uk.” Soccer player and broadcaster Stan Collymore who has also spoken out on depression, also took to Twitter to criticize the stereotype he said Asda and Tesco’s costumes had promoted.