How Women Can Save The World By Telling Epic Stories In The Movies

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If I watch a classic film on Turner Classic Movies, I usually make sure to catch Robert Osborne’s insightful introductions and postscripts. More often than not, he tells me something I didn’t know, and that Post to Facebook Wanna introduce a film on Turner Classic Movies? on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/19YNe7U Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Wanna introduce a film on Turner Classic Movies? Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY 1:16 p.m. EDT October 2, 2013 A new contest will let a Turner Classic Movies fan co-host a film with Robert Osborne. (Photo: TCM) SHARE 28 CONNECT 12 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE If I watch a classic film on Turner Classic Movies, I make sure to catch Robert Osborne’s insightful introductions and postscripts. More often than not, he tells me something I didn’t know, and that even goes for movies I’ve seen dozens of times (like, say, The Graduate). This month, TCM is holding a contest that will let one lucky fan co-host a movie with Osborne. Over at the site for its ” Ultimate Fan Contest ,” you can submit a 90-second video of yourself introducing a classic film.

Free Movies Not Completely Furloughed This Weekend

and Pennsylvania Ave. NW. ** 7:30pm: Airplane! (1980). The seminal spoof of 1970s disaster films. Part of the series The Movies Take to the Air at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va. 8:30pm: Them (1954). Atomic tests turn ants into giant monsters. Free with dinner purchase at American City Diner, 5532 Connecticut Ave. NW. Sunday: 1:30pm: The Dark Knight Rises (2012). Batman teams with Catwoman against a ruthless masked enemy known only as Bane.

These individuals found commonalities between far-flung areas — science, art, philosophy, music, religion, medicine, diplomacy, movies, feminism, technology — and in the process created exciting new works that helped push civilization forward. Being a polymath also means being a cosmopolitan. The term cosmopolitan first arose in the Hellenistic Age in the 4th century B.C. It was in the wake of the conquests of Alexander the Great that the diverse peoples of the Mediterranean and Middle East began to apply Athenian ideals of reason and philosophic inquiry to their own lives. As a result, they began to think of themselves not just as the citizens of an individual city-state (or polis), but as citizens of the cosmos 0- literally cosmopolites — cosmopolitans. Being a cosmopolitan today means that one takes a humanistic delight in the many cultures and forms of knowledge around the world. It does not mean that one doesn’t feel a sense of loyalty to one’s own country — simply that one has a strong interest in the rest of the world and in the common good of humanity. Nations and peoples flourish when they adopt cosmopolitan ideals. One thinks of Elizabethan England, Gupta India, Renaissance Florence, and Tang Dynasty China at the height of the Silk Road. These were eras when travel and trade linked together many fascinating cultures and peoples, and great art and innovation were the result. For women today, being cosmopolitan means being open to the world, to innovation, to new possibilities. It means not being held back by outmoded ideas of what a woman’s place should be, or what kinds of stories a woman should tell on the big screen. In keeping with this spirit, the audience at Social Media Week LA strongly agreed when I suggested that female filmmakers should not be confined to just romantic comedies and chamber dramas.