Best College For Food In America For 2013

‘Top Chef’ food truck brings a taste of New Orleans to the Big Apple

Pictured here (left to right) Smoked sausage po

“How can we have an Act without setting things clear on who shares what,” Punjab’s representative said. Though 22 states participated in the meeting, three BJP-ruled ones Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh did not send their ministers. Food minister K V Thomas said, “States have their opinion and we have ours. We will resolve the issue.” He said a committee has been formed to address concerns. He added about 50% states including BJP-ruled ones will launch the scheme by this year-end. Earlier, leading the attack, Uttar Pradesh food minister Rajendra Chaudhary charged the government with bringing the law “hurriedly” for political gain and “hosting the notification on the web” without putting in place a system to ensure that the poor got foodgrain and there was no diversion of subsidized grains to the open market. “Include states’ concerns in your list of concerns,” he added. Chaudhary asked the Centre to bear 100% additional expenses on all accounts including transportation, handling, commission to ration shop owners and setting up of consumer redressal mechanism. He also sought funds in advance for implementation of the law. UP is the biggest gainer of the central law. Another state government official said that when the Centre is using the scheme for political dividend and can spend huge on food subsidy why can’t it pay little more for other expenses. UPA’s new-found friend JD(U) did not leave the opportunity to put forward its list of demands. Bihar food minister Shyam Rajak said the Centre should bear the entire expenditure on end-to-end computerization of the distribution system. Congress-ruled Andhra Pradesh demanded that the Centre should allocate 1.6 lakh tonnes of additional rice per month to meet its demand. State food minister Sridhar Basu said if the Centre did not help, then the state would end up spending Rs 3,000 crore annually, which would impact its other social security programmes.

As the runner-up for PETAs most vegan-friendly college award, Cornells dedication to local foods and environmental conservation is something to be noted. By implementing initiatives like supporting Local Food Growth, Take Back the Tap (choosing tap water over bottled), and responsible coffee sourcing to lessen a chemical footprint, Cornell students are not just educated through their studies, but in their lives. And while this is commendable, Cornells dining service is all about their events. Happenings like The New York Times columnist Mark Bittman dropping by to discuss his book about nutrition, the National Association of College & University Food Services (NACUFS) annual chef competition, and themed dinners like “A Night at Hogwarts,” offering nothing better than chocolate frogs and butter beer, bring excitement to an incredibly hard-working student body. With more than 30 eateries on campus alone, Cornell offers incentives to encourage students to lead sustainable lifestyles: if you buy a mug on campus, you can get a large coffee, tea, or hot chocolate for the price of a small one. Overall, it seems that Cornellians are more than happy to participate in all their collegiate dining services has to offer. 7UMass Amherst, Amherst, Mass. UMass Amherst UMass Amherst might seem like another large school with plenty of food options, but their dining service program really knows how to please its students. Late-night dining is found in almost every dining hall on campus (as well as one delivering food as late as 4 a.m.)! And why wouldnt you want to order this campus food around the clock? Blackened tilapia, chicken breast schnitzel with chipotle salsa, and Irish coffee bread pudding with Kahlua sauce are only a few of the delicious dining hall offerings. While many students rave about Baby Berk, the burger and taco food truck conveniently located on campus, the school’s pledge to stay local and organic is not overlooked. Through their “Real Food Challenge Campus Commitment,” UMass Amherst hopes their food will be at least 20 percent locally grown and fairly traded. And if their Composting Program and Local Purchasing Program didnt convince you enough, theres a farmers’ market on campus that is entirely student-run.

Food critic Anthony Bourdain admits he was wrong on Santa Fe store’s ‘world famous’ Frito pie

anthony_bourdain.jpg

RELATED: THE SECONDS ARE HELPING ON ‘TOP CHEF MASTERS’ Top Chef judges Tom Colicchio, Padma Lakshmi and Gail Simmons were on site at select locations serving up Southern specialties straight from Domilise’s Po-Boy and Bar in New Orleans. The menu featured beignets, fried shrimp po boys, roast beef po’ boys, jambalaya and red beans with rice. Adrian Lam/New York Daily News Dedicated Top Chef fans waited up to two and a half hours to get a taste of the Big Easy. We were throwing around ideas and said, What’s the one thing New Yorkers can’t get here? And we thought, po’boys from Domilise’s,” Grubstreet editor Alan Sytsma told the Daily News of the delicious collaboration. Adrian Lam/New York Daily News The roast beef po’ boy. To get in on the free lunch, eaters followed their taste buds to Twitter via @BravoTopChef along with their Facebook page where times and locations were announced throughout the day. The truck made stops outside the New York Times Building, Columbus Circle, Time Inc. and Union Square luring in lines of hungry foodies willing to wait up to two and a half hours. I’m a Louisiana native so I’ve been following the food truck all morning! said Zac Denham, 26 of Astoria who waited two hours on his day off to get his hands on a shrimp poboy. I’m just ready to eat! Adrian Lam/New York Daily News Hungry New Yorkers wait in line to get a taste of New Orleans.

Won’t foot food bill: States

Insults dished out by food critic Anthony Bourdain on an episode of CNN’s “Parts Unknown” have stirred up outrage in New Mexico and now he acknowledges that he was wrong. The sharp-tongued chef and writer lashed into the “World Famous” Frito pies sold at Santa Fe’s Five & Dime General Store’s snack bar. The store is a tourist attraction and a mainstay in the city’s historic plaza. The dish, according to Bourdain, was made with canned Hormel Chili and a “day-glow orange cheese-like substance.” But Bourdain spokeswoman Karen Reynolds told The Associated Press on Monday that the writer was incorrect in his description of the chile used by Santa Fe’s Five & Dime General Store’s snack bar to make the Frito pies. “He admits that ‘we got it wrong’ about the chile,” Reynolds said in an email. “And we’ll try to correct it for future airings.” In his critique, Bourdain also said that the local favorite isn’t even a New Mexico meal, but rather a Texas creation. He said New Mexicans should leave the recipe to the Texans. “New Mexico, you have many wonderful things,” Bourdain said. “I think, let Texas have this one.” Mike Collins, store manager of the Five & Dime, says Bourdain was “completely wrong” on the store’s Frito pie. He said their version is homemade from chile grown in New Mexico and remains popular. “I don’t have any idea where he got that from,” Collins said. “I mean, if we’re using canned Hormel Chili then I’d like to buy stock in that because what we have is good.” Still, Collins said he and the staff don’t have any ill feelings toward Bourdain. He said during the taping of the visit, Bourdain was nice and a pleasure to be around.