Beats Says Its New Beats Music Streaming Service Will Launch ‘within The Next Few Months’ In The Us

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Freelancers had been commissioned to compile thousands of these centered around a particular artist, activity, or the general mood of the listener.Wood corroborated this report: Were going to focus really heavily on playlists, because thats how we consume music and thats how most people consume music. Music streaming is a highly competitive space at the moment, with established brands such as Spotify, Rdio and Deezer fighting for new subscribers. Microsoft and Google are trying to muscle in with similar offerings, while Apple opts for a Pandora-style approach with its recently launched iTunes Radio . Wood emphasized that Beats Music would be different and based around a very specific idea. The service is focused on curation, rather than forcing users to search blindly for new tracks or artists that they might like. Were talking about real depth of personalization and knowing who I am, who you are, what were listening to, what we like, what weve listened to before and then offering up music that is highly relevant to our taste profile, he added. Beats has created a formidable empire based on its popular range of high-end headphones, earphones and speakers. It has similar ambitions for Beats Music and will supplement this curation with an algorithm-based approach. You need to start with a great editorial team that has a point of view, but we want to have a situation where we can really scale to the depth of your appetite, he said. If you really love music, we want something that can go deep with you for a really long time. And that requires a perfect harmony between the algorithm and human curation. Between the man and the machine. Prior to joining Beats, Wood was chief strategy officer of Interscope Geffen A&M and President of the imprint DGC Records.

Desperately Seeking Music Equality: Looking Beyond Macklemore’s ‘Same Love’ Success

Macklemore is not the first person to write a great song that could be celebrated as the gay marriage anthem. There are documented recordings by queer artists singing about queer issues (read: their lives) that date back as far as the 1920s, and there is an alliance of out queer artists who continue to sing out loud. They have read the YouTube comments lately, and they do have plenty of reasons to think that hip-hop hates them. We’re used to seeing images of attractive white people as the faces of the movement for LGBTQ equality. We’re used to getting excited when another straight, white person says they support our equality movement, because it’s certainly better than the alternative. But forgive me if I’m tired of doling out cookies to everyone who isn’t a bigot. Most of these celebrities charge events a “nominal fee” to the tune of $10,000 or more as compensation for standing for equality, and much of their support goes to causes like marriage equality, which benefit well-off, white gay people most significantly. Queer recording artists who have been singing out loud before any major media outlet would have celebrated it, and who write about the wide range of issues that plague the LGBTQ community, truly represent the rawness of our diverse community. It would be nice if Macklemore and his crew could give them a shout-out and acknowledge that Macklemore’s ability to get his message out so beautifully had something to do with him being a white, straight, cisgender man. If you really want to do something about the equality movement in music beyond just watching the VMAs offer up a token moment of social awareness, you can start off by supporting out and proud LGBTQ recording artists whose songs and lyrics are the soundtrack to the equality movement. I just learned about OUTMUSIC – The LGBT Academy of Recording Arts (LARA). They have a Kickstarter campaign going on right now to help fund their music documentary film For Which WE Stand (One Queer Music Nation in the Visible), which is specifically about the history of queer recording arts. OUTMUSIC/LARA was forged by life partners Dan Martin and Michael Biello in 1990 and is now headed up by Diedra Meredith, who is rarely mentioned in the tokenized and selectively publicized “lists” of leaders in the movement for LGBTQ equality.